Heh

President Biden invokes “The Swalwell Doctrine.”
By your own admission and order to complete our withdrawal from Afghanistan, aren’t you admitting that maybe that formulation is flawed?
Can I infer you *wouldn’t* nuke the Talibs

, but you *will* be willing to nuke your constituents?

You do understand that the population of the US has *moar guns* than the Talibs? Even if you think they are, “rare” and “unusual” or somesuch bubble-wrapped nonsense?
“Submit!” Sure you aren’t an islamic fundy vice a ” practicing” Catholic?
Sir.

Today’s Medal of Honor Moment for 23 June

Medal of Honor Recipient David R Kingsley. Courtesy the CMOHS.
Three Medals were awarded for actions on the day, one during the Civil War, and two during WWII.  A fight during the Siege of Petersburg, 1864, where Union General Grant tries to sever the Weldon Railroad, one of Confederate General Lee’s major supply arteries for the Army holding Petersburg, and thus, Richmond.

While the Army of the Potomac was able to capture a a segment of the line (after a bitter 5 day fight that started on 23 June) the rebel forces simply stopped the trains short of the the area and carted the goods by wagon. It would be four months before Grant would successfully close off the route. Color Sergeant (Later 2nd Lieutenant) Drury’s medal was not without some controversy. I’m including a link here not to cast any doubt or aspersion on the memory of Drury – but rather for the insight into some of the troubles the Medal has had throughout it’s somewhat checkered past. When you have a better understanding of how the criteria for the Medal developed over the decades, you gain a better appreciation for the seemingly arcane process used in this day and age. Continue reading “Today’s Medal of Honor Moment for 23 June”

Today’s Medal of Honor Moment for 22 June

Medal of Honor recipient William L Hill. Courtesy the CMOHS.
Only two Medals today, after all that activity in China the last few days.

This first one would be a Navy and Marine Corps Medal, the naval services highest award for heroism not involving combat.  From the “Interim Awards, 1871-1898” period.

HILL, William L RANK: CAPTAIN OF THE TOP (HIGHEST RANK: CHIEF BOATSWAIN’S MATE) UNIT/COMMAND: U.S. TRAINING SHIP MINNESOTA DATE: JUNE 22, 1881 PLACE: NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND, USA
CITATION: Serving on board the U.S. training ship Minnesota at Newport, R.I., 22 June 1881, Hill jumped overboard and sustained William Mulcahy, third class boy, who had fallen overboard, until picked up by a steam launch.

The Boxer Rebellion is still providing opportunities to excel:

ALLEN

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, Edward G RANK: BOATSWAIN’S MATE FIRST CLASS (HIGHEST RANK: CHIEF BOATSWAIN) UNIT/COMMAND: U.S.S. NEWARK DATE: JUNE 22, 1900 PLACE: CHINA
CITATION: Fighting with the relief expedition of the Allied forces, 13, 20, 21, and 22 June 1900, Allen distinguished himself by meritorious conduct.

*Asterisk indicates a posthumous award – but there aren’t any, huzzah!

Today’s Medal of Honor Moment for 21 June

Medal of Honor recipient Jared C Monti. Courtesy the CMOHS.

Today opens with the Boxer Rebellion, for more on that, see yesterday’s post. The entries for this day show one of the frustrations of doing these daily posts – the little inconsistencies that pop up in the official records.

CAMPBELL, Albert R. RANK: PRIVATE (HIGHEST RANK: CORPORAL) DATE: JUNE 21, 1900 PLACE: TIENTSIN, CHINA
CITATION: In action at Tientsin, China, 21 June 1900. During the advance on Tientsin, Campbell distinguished himself by his conduct.

[N.B. Foley’s action date is cited variously as 13 July, 19 July, and 21 June. Francis’ citation also says 13 July. However, the Congressional Medal of Honor Society database lists both on 21 June while the citation for their entry says 13 July. I’ve asked for clarification. Ed.]
FOLEY. Alexander J RANK: SERGEANT (HIGHEST RANK: FIRST SERGEANT) UNIT/COMMAND: U.S.S. MONADNOCK DATE: JUNE 21, 1900 PLACE: NEAR TIENTSIN, CHINA
CITATION: In the presence of the enemy during the battle near Tientsin, China, 13 July 1900, Foley distinguished himself by meritorious conduct.

FRANCIS, Charles R. RANK: PRIVATE (HIGHEST RANK: SECOND LIEUTENANT) DATE: JUNE 21, 1900 PLACE: TIENTSIN, CHINA
CITATION: In the presence of the enemy during the battle near Tientsin, China, 13 July 1900, Francis distinguished himself by meritorious conduct.

KATES, Thomas W. RANK: PRIVATE (HIGHEST RANK: SERGEANT) DATE: JUNE 21, 1900 PLACE: TIENTSIN, CHINA
CITATION: In presence of the enemy during the advance on Tientsin, China, 21 June 1900, Kates distinguished himself by meritorious conduct.

Continue reading “Today’s Medal of Honor Moment for 21 June”

Today’s Medal of Honor Moment for 20 June

Medal of Honor recipient William J O’Brien. Courtesy the CMOHS.

There are thirty Medals awarded for actions this day, twenty-eight from the China Relief Expedition (see 55 Days at Peking) bookended by a lifesaving award and a hard-dying battalion commander in WWII.

First up – from the Korean Campaign of 1871.  Today this would be awarded as a Navy and Marine Corps Medal, the naval service’s highest award for heroism not involving armed combat.

BENSON, JAMES

Rank and organization: Seaman, U.S. Navy. Born: 1845, Denmark. Enlisted at: Yokohama, Japan. G.O. No.: 180, 10 October 1872. Citation: On board the U.S.S. Ossipee, 20 June 1872. Risking his life, Benson leaped into the sea while the ship was going at a speed of 4 knots and endeavored to save John K. Smith, landsman, of the same vessel, from drowning.

Continue reading “Today’s Medal of Honor Moment for 20 June”

Today’s Medal of Honor Moment for 19 June

Medal of Honor recipient John W Meagher. Courtesy the CMOHS.

There are 24 Medals awarded for actions on this day – 17 of them from one event.

We start off with the Civil War, and another one of those “mess o’ medals” that characterize some Navy engagements. Remember, the Medal of Honor was our first formal award for heroism since the lapsing of the Purple Heart, an award instituted by General George Washington, and not originally associated with combat wounding, as it is now. During the era of the Civil through Spanish American Wars, the Medal of Honor was the only award available on a regularized basis. What follows now are 17 awards for the same fight among the crew of the same ship, which in modern times would probably be spread amongst the Bronze and Silver Stars. Continue reading “Today’s Medal of Honor Moment for 19 June”

Today’s Medal of Honor Moment for 18 June

Medal of Honor recipient James G Clark. Courtesy the CMOHS.

There are four Medals awarded for action in the Civil War, all on the exact same day, in two battles, at opposite ends of Virginia.

We’re back for the last day of the Battle of Petersburg. Let’s let Confederate General Beauregard relate what it was to face men such as the three who earned Medals on that last day of the battle, before the Armies settled down to the Siege. From “Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, Volume 4.” Continue reading “Today’s Medal of Honor Moment for 18 June”

Do a buddy a favor

[This is a slightly edited old post from the old blog – the edits removed some time-based references. While not this house and flag, I did drop off a flag today, coming back from the Grumpy Old Men Breakfast Club.]

Do a buddy a favor.png

This isn’t trolling for you guys to say nice things to me – it’s to inspire you to do what I do, now and again.

This is a house along the route I used to drive a couple of times a week. It’s not as obvious in the picture

, but that flag is tattered, tired, and ratty. The hem is gone and the stripes are starting to separate.

The home is not in great shape. I took a risk going up those stairs, if only because of the size of the shadow I cast.

Based on the evidence going up to the door, a former Marine lives there.

I just left the flag and the note. To my lights, there’s less chance of embarrassing someone – because the intent is not to shame someone. It’s to brighten their day a tiny bit, in a way that I can.  I’ve done this about a dozen times.  Flags are cheap.

Just paying my respects to my brothers and sisters in arms.

You drive by these homes, too. Every day.

The 4th of July is coming up, Flag Day was this past week…

Cut a brother a huss, to reach back to a nearly forgotten war. You can afford it, and they probably can’t.