Today’s Medal of Honor Post for 9 August

An average day for the Medal, with 10 awards. We open with the Civil War and Cedar Mountain, Virginia, 1862.

CORLISS, GEORGE W.

Rank and organization: Captain, Company C, 5th Connecticut Infantry. Place and date: At Cedar Mountain, Va., 9 August 1862. Entered service at: New Haven, Conn. Birth: ——. Date ·S issue: 10 September 1897. Citation: Seized a fallen flag of the regiment, the color bearer having been killed, carried it forward in the face of a severe fire, and though himself shot down and permanently disabled, planted the staff in the earth and kept the flag flying.

YOUNKER, JOHN L.

Rank and organization: Private, Company A, 12th U.S. Infantry. Place and date: At Cedar Mountain, Va., 9 August 1862. Entered service at: —–. Birth: Germany. Date of issue: 1 November 1893. Citation: voluntarily carried an order, at great risk of life in the face of a fire of grape and canister; in doing this he was wounded.

The Indian Campaigns. A rough day at Big Hole, Montana.

BROWN, LORENZO D.Rank and organization: Private, Company A, 7th U.S. Infantry. Place and date: At Big Hole, Mont. 9 August 1877. Entered service at: Indianapolis, Ind. Birth: Davidson County, N.C. Date of issue: 8 May 1878. Citation: After having been severely wounded in right shoulder, continued to do duty in a most courageous manner.

CLARK, WILFRED

Rank and organization: Private, Company L, 2d U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Big Hole, Mont., 9 August 1877; at Camas Meadows, Idaho, 20 August 1877. Entered service at:——. Birth: Philadelphia Pa. Date of issue: 28 February 1878. Citation: Conspicuous gallantry, especial skill as sharpshooter.

EDWARDS, WILLIAM D.

Rank and organization: First Sergeant, Company F, 7th U.S. Infantry. Place and date: At Big Hole, Mont., 9 August 1877. Entered service at:——. Birth: Brooklyn, N.Y. Date of issue: 2 December 1878. Citatlon: Bravery in action.

McLENNON, JOHN

Rank and organization: Musician, Company A, 7th U.S. Infantry. Place and date: At Big Hole, Mont., 9 August 1877. Entered service at: ——. Birth: Fort Belknap, Tex. Date of issue: 2 December 1878. Citation: Gallantry in action.

ROGAN, PATRICK

Rank and organization: Sergeant, Company A, 7th U.S. Infantry. Place and date: At Big Hole, Mont., 9 August 1877. Entered service at: ——. Birth: Ireland. Date of issue: 2 December 1878. Citation: Verified and reported the company while subjected to a galling fire from the enemy.

WILSON, MILDEN H.

Rank and organization: Sergeant, Company I, 7th U.S. Infantry. Place and date: At Big Hole, Mont., 9 August 1877. Entered service at: Newark, Ohio. Birth: Huron County, Ohio. Date of issue: 2 December 1878. Citation: Gallantry in forming company from line of skirmishers and deploying again under a galling fire, and in carrying dispatches at the imminent risk of his life.

World War I, Chipilly Ridge, France.

ALLEX, JAKE

Rank and organization: Corporal, U.S. Army, Company H, 131st Infantry, 33d Division. Place and date: At Chipilly Ridge, France, 9 August 1918. Entered service at: Chicago, Ill. Born: 13 July 1887, Prizren, Serbia. G.O. No.: 44, W.D., 1919. Citation: At a critical point in the action, when all the officers with his platoon had become casualties, Cpl. Allex took command of the platoon and led it forward until the advance was stopped by fire from a machinegun nest. He then advanced alone for about 30 yards in the face of intense fire and attacked the nest. With his bayonet he killed 5 of the enemy, and when it was broken, used the butt of his rifle, capturing 15 prisoners.

World War II, in the air over France.

*LINDSEY, DARRELL R. (Air Mission)Rank and organization: Captain, U.S. Army Air Corps. Place and date: L’Isle Adam railroad bridge over the Seine in occupied France, 9 August 1944. Entered service at: Storm Lake, Iowa. Birth: Jefferson, Iowa. G.O. No.: 43, 30 May 1945. Citation: On 9 August 1944, Capt. Lindsey led a formation of 30 B-26 medium bombers in a hazardous mission to destroy the strategic enemy held L’lsle Adam railroad bridge over the Seine in occupied France. With most of the bridges over the Seine destroyed, the heavily fortified L’Isle Adam bridge was of inestimable value to the enemy in moving troops, supplies, and equipment to Paris. Capt. Lindsey was fully aware of the fierce resistance that would be encountered. Shortly after reaching enemy territory the formation was buffeted with heavy and accurate antiaircraft fire. By skillful evasive action, Capt. Lindsey was able to elude much of the enemy flak, but just before entering the bombing run his B-26 was peppered with holes. During the bombing run the enemy fire was even more intense, and Capt. Lindsey’s right engine received a direct hit and burst into flames. Despite the fact that his ship was hurled out of formation by the violence of the concussion, Capt. Lindsey brilliantly maneuvered back into the lead position without disrupting the flight. Fully aware that the gasoline tanks might explode at any moment, Capt. Lindsey gallantly elected to continue the perilous bombing run. With fire streaming from his right engine and his right wing half enveloped in flames, he led his formation over the target upon which the bombs were dropped with telling effect. Immediately after the objective was attacked, Capt. Lindsey gave the order for the crew to parachute from the doomed aircraft. With magnificent coolness and superb pilotage, and without regard for his own life, he held the swiftly descending airplane in a steady glide until the members of the crew could jump to safety. With the right wing completely enveloped in flames and an explosion of the gasoline tank imminent, Capt. Lindsey still remained unperturbed. The last man to leave the stricken plane was the bombardier, who offered to lower the wheels so that Capt. Lindsey might escape from the nose. Realizing that this might throw the aircraft into an uncontrollable spin and jeopardize the bombardier’s chances to escape, Capt. Lindsey refused the offer. Immediately after the bombardier had bailed out, and before Capt. Lindsey was able to follow, the right gasoline tank exploded. The aircraft sheathed in fire, went into a steep dive and was seen to explode as it crashed. All who are living today from this plane owe their lives to the fact that Capt. Lindsey remained cool and showed supreme courage in this emergency.

Vietnam – near Cam Lo.

LEE, HOWARD V.Rank and organization: Major, U.S. Marine Corps, Company E, 2d Battalion, 4th Marines, 3d Marine Division (Rein). place and date: Near Cam Lo, Republic of Vietnam, 8 and 9 August 1966. Entered service at: Dumfries, Va. Born: 1 August 1933, New York, N.Y. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. A platoon of Maj. (then Capt.) Lee’s company, while on an operation deep in enemy territory, was attacked and surrounded by a large Vietnamese force. Realizing that the unit had suffered numerous casualties, depriving it of effective leadership, and fully aware that the platoon was even then under heavy attack by the enemy, Maj Lee took 7 men and proceeded by helicopter to reinforce the beleaguered platoon. Maj. Lee disembarked from the helicopter with 2 of his men and, braving withering enemy fire, led them into the perimeter, where he fearlessly moved from position to position, directing and encouraging the overtaxed troops. The enemy then launched a massive attack with the full might of their forces. Although painfully wounded by fragments from an enemy grenade in several areas of his body, including his eye, Maj. Lee continued undauntedly throughout the night to direct the valiant defense, coordinate supporting fire, and apprise higher headquarters of the plight of the platoon. The next morning he collapsed from his wounds and was forced to relinquish command. However the small band of marines had held their position and repeatedly fought off many vicious enemy attacks for a grueling 6 hours until their evacuation was effected the following morning. Maj. Lee’s actions saved his men from capture, minimized the loss of lives, and dealt the enemy a severe defeat. His indomitable fighting spirit, superb leadership, and great personal valor in the face of tremendous odds, reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the U.S. Naval Service.

*Indicates a posthumous award.

Published by The Armorer

A grumpy old Cincinnatus who feeds goats, dogs, cats, ducks, peafowl, a horse, and sundry avians, especially in the winter. From time to time you will see guns. Until such time as the Progressives repeal the 2nd Amendment, everything you see is legal, Federal, State, Local, where I live. Your progressive paradise may have different rules. Don't project them onto me. Federalism still exists, even if it is but a shadow of what the Framers intended.

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